Tuesday, November 11, 2008

Scrapping Common Sense

It's a time of economic decline, there is yet another tax hike on the horizon, and so London bureaucrats and politicians logically start talking about recycling kitchen scraps. The city's environment and transportation committee is recommending regular garbage collection be reduced to once every two weeks, along with the implementation of a green bin program, that is estimated to cost $8.5 million to start with and another $6.5 million annually to operate. Apparently shifting scraps of biodegradable food bits is going to save the landfill that is projected to be full in 15 years.

Londoners could be using a green bin to recycle kitchen scraps faster than city hall bureaucrats are calling for.

And, in an unexpected twist, city politicians yesterday urged staff to consider reducing garbage pickup to once every two weeks year-round.

Both measures, suggested by city council's environment and transportation committee, go beyond what city hall staff had proposed.

The more aggressive options pleased Coun. Joni Baechler, a member of the committee.

"I'm concerned the longer we delay, the more space we're taking up in the landfill," she said. (LFpress)
And while I long for the days when everything just went into a big black garbage bag before being hauled out to the curb, it could be worse. We could be living in Toronto where you need a manual to figure out which receptacle to put your waste in.

8 comments:

Fenris Badwulf said...

Toronto, the city of Light.

These people are out of tune with reality, aren't they?

Jake said...

This green bin program is a waste of money. It is expected to add a meager 2 years to the life of London's landfill--which has room to expand to nearly twice the current size.

The initial start up cost plus the annual operating cost of the program would cost more than to just expand the landfill for another 40-50 years.

A more cost effective method to reduce household garbage would be to just give a composer to every household to dispose of their kitchen scraps.

Carmi said...

Penny wise, pound foolish. The cost/benefit equation is decidedly incomplete. The city talks about "saving the landfill" but doesn't seem to have any data to quantify the dollar savings resulting from said extension.

Meanwhile, this supposedly justifies major spending on a new program. Guess who's getting hosed again.

Mike said...

Are you still allowed those old-fashioned, outdated flush toilets in London, or have you stopped fighting change, and adopted a more modern brown bin system?

Lisa said...

Yep, the brown bin is next Mike. Don't laugh too hard at us poor suckers who remain in this crumbling city.

Mike said...

The World is my blue box, I shall not recycle.

ab said...

If you want your 'opinions' heard tell the city directly. They are currently taking public feedback on the green bin program.

www.londoncompost.com has all the links.

Richard said...

Isn't that what compost bins are for?