Thursday, February 21, 2008

Aging brickwork

According to city engineer Pat McNally, sinkholes in London are often caused by aging brickwork. With Council voting tonight on a 4.4 per cent tax rate increase, that would seem to be a likely explanation.

Sinkhole Exhibit ASinkhole Exhibit B

Left photo: Morris Lamont, Sun Media

10 comments:

Jake said...

Lets hope the next sinkhole forms at Wellington and Dufferin encircling City Hall. The water from the break can form a mote trapping council for weeks on end. Likely have to live off rations at the City Hall cafeteria.

basil said...

Oh God no! They'll air lift them by helicopter from the piazza and set up shop in the Delta Armories, at taxpayers' expense, for the 3 months it takes to fix it. Then they'll all start taking sick leave when they have to return to city hall and sue the city for damages due to the emotional trauma the experience caused them.

Anonymous said...

This sensational terminology of “sinkhole” for “water main break” is as silly as the dogma around the global warming scare. They fix a pipe and it’s now called a sinkhole? The sky is falling. Run for the hills. Ahahahaha!
We have around 170 repairs to water lines every year, give or take 10 or so. Get over it.
They break like anything else.

eng said...

This sensational terminology of “sinkhole” for “water main break” is as silly as the dogma around the global warming scare.
Doesn't take much for you to call something "sensational" does it?

Calling a collapse of soil a "sink hole" is calling it what it is, based on what is observed. A separate process is trying to determine why it happened, instead of jumping to conclusions and calling it what you concluded it is.

What is silly, for example, is seeing a snowstorm, and instead of calling it local weather, shrieking that this is proof there is no global warming.

It's that old scientific method. Separating observations from conclusions.

For example, I observe that your comment reeks of sarcasm and sneering contempt. I could conclude that you are likely a retard, but I'll wait until you provide more observational evidence.

basil said...

Gee whiz, I would not have thought a "retard" capable of sarcasm - sort of defies the definition. On the other hand, I'm a little confused as to how a hole 10 meter wide and two meter deep hole can be anything other than a sink hole. I usually think of the typical water main break as being the gushing crack in the pavement, usually less than a square meter - here in London, I've witnessed many of those.

But something 10 meters wide and two meters deep - that is a sunken piece of road.

Anonymous said...

I work on these "sinkholes" as you call them, or breaks as we call them.Every now and hten we have a sinkhole like last years, get over it.
When you have a flat tire do you call it a deflation crisis?
Keep up the fear, we are laughing down in our holes.
You are welcome by the way.

Anonymous said...

It would be hard to avoid the conclusion that we are a society composed almost entirely of battered wifes, drunk drivers, molested children, humiliated ethnic groups, exploited workers and other groups despised for their sexual preferences or cultural attributes, all festering in a spoiling environment with ever growing sinkholes. Keep up the hype and dogma and fear like the enviros do?

Herm's sport equipment said...

Hey watermain break fixer-upper.

Is Timmy Whitworth, the president of your union still getting that sweetheart deal from Jeffie-boy Fielding, over and above the collective agreement?

How Suuuuuuuuueeeeeyyyyyyyyyet it is!

basil said...

Anon: It would be hard to avoid the conclusion that we are a society composed almost entirely of battered wifes, drunk drivers, molested children, humiliated ethnic groups, exploited workers and other groups despised for their sexual preferences or cultural attributes, all festering in a spoiling environment with ever growing sinkholes.

Based on what? What you read on this site? Cite some examples. These sound like your judgments, not ours.

According to Answers.com: Sinkholes occur in urban areas due to water main breaks or sewer collapses when old pipes give way.

Gee, that sounds a lot like that thing that was in the middle of the road at Wellington and Dundas that was not a sinkhole.

According to the Concise Oxford, a sink hole is also a "place of vice and corruption". I like metaphors. And this is a good one. You can draw your own conclusions about the appropriateness this on the larger city scale, but I was hanging out at that corner last night, and from what I saw, it's looking like a sinkhole.

I enjoyed the sinkhole; it's something to write and sing about. It did very little to inconvenience me and it was fodder for all kinds of people. Who needs a performing arts center when you have sinkholes? It was promoted by other cities across the country in their pleas for money from governments. Sorry dude, but for London it was something of an event.

You sound like maybe your daily job has dulled your appreciation of them and you are sounding a little bitter.
'Tis e'en so: the hand of little employment hath the daintier sense.

NIAC said...

*sigh*

Wow, London sure has a lot of [water-main breaks and/or sewer collapses], don't you think? Like the really big [water-main break and/or sewer collapse] downtown, and the Oxford, Richmon, Fanshawe and then Dufferin [water-main breaks and/or sewer collapses].

I don't get why people come in here to extole the virtues of what the thing is called: I think most Londoners make a big deal about it because there is a separate line on your PUC bill for [water-main maintenance and/or sewer pre-collapse infrastructure].

JMHO, of course. I mean, I won't judge too harshly, because I am NOT employed to keep it from happening - one time, let alone almost 200.