Sunday, October 7, 2007

Sure, haven't you seen the hospital food?

An August SES Research/Sun Media poll suggests that 51 per cent of Ontarians think that "little has changed" within the province's health-care system and 18 per cent think that services are worse, despite a 30 per cent increase in public funding since 2003 and the introduction of health premium taxes.

Promises by the Liberals and Progressive Conservatives for yet further increases in funding then seem to be aimed at both voters under 30 and over 59 years of age, who were most likely to respond that the health care system had improved. The article identifies these constituencies as the least and most likely respectively to use the health care system, but possibly an altogether more important factor is that neither age group is in its prime earning years and contributing as much of their income into taxes as the 30-59 cohort, which also happened to respond more frequently that the province's health system is the same or has become worse.

While the response of younger voters is most likely from experience to be random or immaterial, older respondents have an undeniable invested interest in supporting escalating health-care expenditures for which, at the same time, they have a declining stake in making the payments.

This is the price of socializing health care in a democracy — we're aggregated into opinion and funding blocs in which both opinion and funding have no demonstrable meaning to or consequence on the actual health care an individual might receive.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

possibly an altogether more important factor is that neither age group is in its prime earning years and contributing as much of their income into taxes as the 30-59 cohort

It's true. You know what they say? 30 is the new 20. Wait'll they start designing longer and longer degree programs and making people wait longer and longer til they can get into professional school, and government health care will sell extremely well to everyone in the under-45 and over-50 demographics. And the fully qualified 45-49 y.o. wage earners will probably find something really, really urgent they have to do over in Dubai, Bahamas, or somewhere like that.

But hey - more poverty means more dependence on politicians, doesn't it? Some things were made to fail.

Bruce Gottfred said...

Why would you expect to see progress so soon? The 10-Year Plan to Strengthen Health Care has only been active for 3 years!

5-year plans are so yesterday. Everyone knows it takes a 10-year plan to really make a difference.

MapMaster said...

Why would you expect to see progress so soon?

Why not? This is an election after all, not a period of reflection and consideration.

Personally, I'll suspend judgement until the third or fourth 10-year plan.