Monday, September 10, 2007

Which veils should be lifted?

Much ado lately about Election Canada's decision to allow veiled women to cast ballots in federal elections, and while it might seem warming to finally find some popular concern expressed over the methods by which governments are chosen in this country, these are nothing really but swift kicks at a barn door that's long lost its hinges (assuming that the kicks are aimed in good faith and not out of a latent fear of one constituency in particular). Despite some recent tightening of protocols, voter identification rules in Canada are so lax that the national myth of civic gentility is the only real marketable defense against suspicions of election fraud, which is to say nothing at all of election fraud itself, of course.

See also: Lorne Gunter, Voting while veiled, The National Post:

Up to and including the last federal election, it was unnecessary for voters to prove their identity when going to vote. It was common to be asked for photo ID before making a $20 credit-card purchase, boarding a plane or buying cigarettes at a corner store, but not before performing the seminal act in a democracy.

1 Comment:

Anonymous said...

It was common to be asked for photo ID before making a $20 credit-card purchase, boarding a plane or buying cigarettes at a corner store, but not before performing the seminal act in a democracy.

That's because when you go to the store for smokes you're trading your property for somebody elses. They check your ID because they don't want to get ripped off. The seminal act of democracy is that people are voting themselves someone else's property. The government employees at the polling booth do not check their ID because they are collaborators in the scam and not victims of it.