Thursday, August 2, 2007

Spurious use of quotation marks in headline

London Free Press:  Socialist council members hit back

According to the Free Press, London's Killer B's are upset that they're being called socialists after opposing the development of an industrial park because it would fall outside the planning committee's artificial growth boundary.

Would calling them central planners for the command economy make it all better, then?

4 comments:

Alice the Camel said...

Central planners does roll softer off the tongue. The ist in socialist makes a person spit.

Elaine said...

Why don't socialist like to be called socialist?

Gosnell better watch his step or they will pulling out the harassment card on him.

Next thing you know the human right watch dogs down at city hall will be making Gosnell set in a corner for being mean to the girlies.

That is what is wrong with politics, it attracts whiney women who can't play risk with the big boys. Come on Shelia Fraser, run, please run, show those girlies how it is done.

Jake said...

Tom Gosnel is just calling a spade a spade. He knows that with socialist at the helm, London's future is bleak if we don't smarten up fast.

At least when he was mayor, our taxes were some of the lowest in Canada and we focused on providing basic services and not spend on huge debt-ridden projects. Also, we had respect nationally as a city that was fiscally conservative.

By the time the next election rolls around in 2010--with the likelihood of the Board of Control eliminated--I think Tom Gosnel is going to run for mayor again. He may not be perfect, but a hell of a lot better than De Cicco-Worst or any of the Killer B's.

MapMaster said...

Why Gosnell or anyone else with a smattering of sense in them would think that they could corral this collection of socialists is beyond me. I will give Gosnell credit for at least acknowledging the existence of fiscal and economic realities, but it's only too easy with this council to position oneself rhetorically as a conservative or capitalist. His performance as deputy mayor suggests that he can adopt combative and apologetic positions with equal facility, depending on his audience. If he has in fact reined in the worst excesses of taxation and regulation of his colleagues, then we're in worse trouble than I thought. But I agree that we might be marginally better off with Gosnell as mayor than, say, Barber or Hume or DeCicco, although possibly at the expense of more corruption.