Thursday, December 15, 2005

City lawyers to have another go at the OMB

The London Free Press reports that city lawyers will ask divisional court on Dec. 20 for leave to appeal the recent contentious OMB order to London to replace its seven two-councillor wards with fourteen smaller single-councillor wards. On Dec. 22, city lawyers will ask the OMB for a review of rehearing of the decision as the Board reconvenes in London to assess the implementation of the ruling.

"If the board (refuses the city's request) and issues an order before the end of the year, then the election would be carried out in accordance with the board's order, subject to the outcome of the court appeal," said city lawyer Jim Barber.

Barber also told controllers there's not enough time to hire outside legal help, although the board passed a resolution giving him the option to hire a lawyer if necessary.
That's too bad, the city could apparently benefit from outside legal assistance. The city's arguments in the original hearing were poorly prepared and failed to rebut most of Imagine London's appalling assertions, allowing the Board's arbitrator, Douglas Gates, the indulgence of choosing between weak positions and substituting arbitrary collectivist platitudes for sound judgment. I'm not a lawyer myself, but considering that this is a political rather than legal matter, I submit these positions to the city's lawyers for consideration…

2 comments:

Pietr said...

Having read the 'Imagineering' article I can now add a few thoughts of my own.
The division of wards according to 'class'(the accurate description of Imagine's thinking, not the bowdlerised public version)is designed to subdivide Imagine's power base into as any seats as possible while keeping all the malcontents in a few reserves.
Transparently obvious, this gerrymandering would ensure repetitive return of political majorities sympathetic to Imagine.

MapMaster said...

100% truth, Sorehead. Welcome to contemporary class politics — discredited the first time around, now all dressed up as postmodern fuzzy warm feelings.