Wednesday, October 19, 2005



The London Fog's London Budget 2006 Archives
Fiscal responsibility, London-style Wednesday, May 3, 2006
As reported yesterday, council voted Monday not to re-open the 2006 budget and pass a 3.9 per cent hike in residential property taxes. Mayor Anne Marie DeCicco and most councillors opposed re-opening the budget to provide tax relief from "surplus" money earmarked for debt reduction.

"You don't borrow from the future to pay for today," London Mayor Anne Marie DeCicco said.

It's very noble of DeCicco and council to act on our behalf in the cause of fiscal responsibility — especially when the approved 2006 capital budget includes $30 million in new debt financing. Total corporate debt at the end of 2005 stood at $371.1 million, or over $1,000 per resident.
Save the twelve dollars, you're going to need it Tuesday, May 2, 2006
City council last night declined to re-open the 2006 budget and left London homeowners holding the bill for a 3.9 per cent increase in property taxes. As an incentive to remain calm during an election year, however, the London Free Press reports that council did pass a motion for "a review of water and sewer rates aimed at shifting the costs of water and sewer services from homeowners to industrial, commercial and institutional users."
Special interests speak out on London budget.
Hint: it's not for your interest
Monday, May 1, 2006
City council meets tonight to decide whether to approve a 3.9 per cent tax hike instead of the 2.95 per cent increase council passed in January, or to re-open the budget to find some means of reducing the hike to three per cent or less. Having faced hikes of 5.9 and 6.6 per cent in the past two years, London homeowners are among the highest taxed in the country — and even if the increase is reduced to three per cent, hikes for sewer and water charges of 9.6 and 5 per cent means that the overall increase would still be nearly five per cent. Needless to say, mayor Anne Marie DeCicco and board of control — with the exception of Tom Gosnell — are recommending that the 3.9 per cent hike be passed.
It's going to get more expensive to live in London, version 2006.1 Thursday, April 27, 2006
Remember the good old days back in January?
[C]ouncil has approved a 2006 budget that raises residential property taxes by 2.95 per cent. After two years of 5.9 and 6.6 per cent increases, this year's hike may appear to be a relief — such are the reduced expectations of Londoners. Property taxes get the big press, but Londoners will be paying 9.6 and 5 per cent increases in sewer and water rates respectively.
Ah, but the much less ballyhooed caveat was that the relatively less onerous increase for homeowners in an election year owed less to a trifling with the idea of fiscal restraint and mostly on the redistribution of the tax burden to commercial properties and the unguaranteed approval of the provincial government.
Thanks for your fiscal restraint and your foresight Thursday, January 26, 2006
That little matter of the 2.95 per cent increase in property taxes that council approved in its budget on Tuesday is, unsurprisingly, still up in the air…
It's going to get more expensive to live in London… again Wednesday, January 25, 2006
The London Free Press reports that council has approved a 2006 budget that raises residential property taxes by 2.95 per cent. After two years of 5.9 and 5.3 per cent increases, this year's hike may appear to be a relief — such are the reduced expectations of Londoners…
And that little matter of the budget… Tuesday, January 24, 2006
In another development reported in the London Free Press, it turns out that council's much-ballyhooed plans to deliver a property tax increase of three per cent in an election year are predicated on shifting the tax burden to businesses and the unguaranteed approval of the provincial government…
Please tell us more about your fiscal discipline Friday, January 20, 2006
The amount of debt per person in London was $1,070 in 2004, the last year for which the city collected data. That was double the amount in Kingston and Hamilton, eight times the level in St. Thomas and above levels in Toronto, Windsor, Barrie, Ottawa, Guelph and Chatham-Kent…
What about the potholes and the soaring debt? Thursday, January 19, 2006
The mechanic shortage is reaching epic proportions here in London Ontario, yet today the Free Press reports the expected 'surplus' is about $9 million. And not only has the city collected a reported excess of loot, also from today, we learn that taxpayers in London are among the highest taxed in the country…
Save London Roads! Close Fanshawe Pioneer Village Sunday, December 11, 2005
Overtaxed Londoners may recall that Fanshawe Pioneer Village is part of the list of organizations receiving free handouts from council…
City hall cannot be trusted with taxes Sunday, December 11, 2005
The London Free Press reports that council will use only $650,000 of last year's $8.7 million budget "surplus" for tax relief as city staff had recommended in a report — in effect, a few dollars per property owner…
"It shows we're ahead of the curve, that we're making investments" Sunday, December 4, 2005
Anne-Marie DeCicco, earlier in the week, defended extravagant taxation and spending in London…
London can't afford its local government Friday, December 2, 2005
In practice, fiscal restraint to this administration means capping additional debt at $30 million a year and proposing a 5 per cent hike in property taxes in addition to assessment growth of 2.1 per cent. The current adminstration clearly has no idea what fiscal restraint actually means…
Riches of embarassment for council…
more taxes for the rest of us
Wednesday, November 30, 2005
A freeze on development that's cost London city hall about $220,000 to defend has been quashed by Ontario's top court because council pushed it through in secret…
London's Ryugyong Wednesday, November 30, 2005
Asked if borrowing for the JLC and other projects had put the city into a hole, Coun. Fred Tranquilli, said: "There's no sense having good roads if you have nowhere to go."
". . . the side streets resemble Siberia" Friday, November 25, 2005
A motion to return $200,000 to the budget for sidewalk snow removal — a cut approved last year — was defeated by an 11-7 vote…
Melba Toast Thursday, November 24, 2005
Arguments that using London's $8.7 million budget "surplus" for debt reduction will help lower taxes in the long term by reducing interest charges are predicated on the assumption that city hall will suddenly begin practicing fiscal restraint and refrain from incurring new debt. Is there any reason to believe this will start happening now?
Don't trust council with a "surplus" Wednesday, November 23, 2005
After two consecutive years of $12 million budget "surpluses," senior administrators at city hall are recommending to council that a miserly $600,000 of an expected $8.7-million budget surplus should be used to "reduce property taxes" — in effect, a few dollars per property owner…
The sewers were neglected in favour of the JLC Thursday, November 17, 2005
Controllers approved up to $500,000 be spent on a plan to improve customer service at city hall that will begin by surveying people who use city services…
It's only your money… Wednesday, November 16, 2005
…so don't give this post a second thought
There's a truck stuck in the sewer Wednesday, November 16, 2005
here is only one thing you can be certain of in London Ontario - if you aren't poor yet, you will be…
Thanks for the two bucks, now scram Monday, November 14, 2005
There is no better model for default governance of an apathetic population in Canada than the federal Liberal party, an exemplar of electoral success that London city hall mimics beautifully in miniature…
Election year budget creates moderate discomfort to special interest groups and propitiatory council Thursday, November 10, 2005
With a municipal election coming up next year, London city council is confused…
Assorted London anaesthetics… Wednesday, October 26, 2005
Next year's draft budget calls for grants of $500,000 to Fanshawe, $1 million to UWO and $2.14 million to London hospitals. Together, they add up to nearly a one-per-cent tax hike — one-fifth the total proposed in a draft budget…
London 2006 budget deliberations begin.
Citizen advisory in effect: start saving…
Sunday, October 23, 2005
The hopes and fears of all our year 2006 are here with us tonight — the annual London pre-budget entrails are being read…
London Ontario — an expensive place to raise a family Wednesday, October 19, 2005
The annual culmination of the ongoing deliberation process to steal your money away is fast approaching here in London Ontario…

The London Fog's London Budget 2005 Archives



London Budget News Release — Paul Van Meerbergen
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"London as a Creative City" — by Paul Van Meerbergen
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Capital Budget Amendments — by Paul Van Meerbergen
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Operating Budget Amendments — by Paul Van Meerbergen
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