Wednesday, September 28, 2005

Paul Martin is a Liar

In Canada, lying is okay so long as you apologize and say I'm sorry once you have been caught. If you had the interest of the people in mind at the time of the lie, then that lie is not only permissible, it is a virtue. And of course, you must be a member of the Party.

Prime Minister Paul Martin apologized to the father of a slain Mountie for claiming to have had "long discussions" with him about getting tough on criminals.

Martin called Rev. Don Schiemann yesterday after being roasted in the House by the Conservatives for offending the families of four RCMP officers killed last March in Mayerthorpe, Alta., during question period Monday with his claims of the lengthy talks.


From CTV:
"The prime minister told the House in response that he had 'met the families and had long discussions.' The families told us afterwards that no such discussions took place," Harper said, demanding to know why the prime minister would "mislead the House".

Commons Speaker Peter Milliken tried to remind MPs that questions of a personal nature are out of order, but Martin was already on his feet.

"I said I was in Alberta for the memorial. I met with each of the families at that time and I met with them individually and discussed this," he responded. "I did have discussions with each family in Alberta at that time, and that's a matter of public record."

When Harper rose to ask for Martin to give the families an apology, the prime minister offered a sharp response.

"I don't think it's appropriate for the member to make political gamesmanship on such an emotional event," Martin said, insisting he would be happy to meet with any of the families.

"I would be delighted to do so today, but surely to heaven, this is not the kind of issue that the honourable member ought to play politics with."
More at Dust my Broom.

Paul Martin on David Dingwall:
Martin defended Dingwall as longtime participant in public life who helped the mint escape from red ink.

"Mr. Dingwall has dedicated most of his life to the public service. He has been a member of Parliament, he has been a cabinet minister in the Government of Canada," Martin said.

"Under his tutelage . . . the mint has now been returned to profit."
Paul Martin and consulting firms:
The Earnscliffe Strategy Group, an Ottawa consulting firm with close political ties to Prime Minister Paul Martin, has received more than $10 million in federal government money since the Liberals took power, new documents show.

And another Ottawa polling firm that has sometimes worked with Earnscliffe received more than $61 million in the same period.

Ottawa-based EKOS Research was awarded more than 1,600 contracts over the 111/2-year period, mostly for public opinion research.

[..] Most of the finance work was done by Earnscliffe senior partners David Herle, who ran Mr. Martin's 1990 leadership bid, and Elly Alboim, a former CBC producer.
And Heda Margolius Kovaly on totalitarian regimes:
It is not hard for a totalitarian regime to keep people ignorant. Once you relinquish your freedom for the sake of "understood necessity,", for Party discipline, for conformity with the regime, for the greatness and glory of the Fatherland, or for any of the substitutes that are so convincingly offered, you cede your claim to the truth. Slowly, drop by drop, your life begins to ooze away just as surely as if you had slashed your wrists; you have voluntarily condemned yourself to helplessness.

Under a Cruel Star

2 comments:

darcey said...

The ooze is seeping out all over. In the question period video Martin accuses Harper of playing politics with the Mayerthorpe case - here we have..ta da!

What a slime ball

Pietr said...

A little reverse sleaze here.
As you may be aware, the British Revenue office takes your money and asks questions afterwards(Western Government);yesterday I bought a new bike.
On the same day,the Revenue refunded me £300 for the tax year 2003-2004, when I was still working for Pinky & Perky.
This is good news, as I still have the next two tax years to come, and the wage should be substantial.