Wednesday, September 28, 2005

Improvements in London translate to incoherent setbacks

It's all about heritage: Proud to leave Londoners in suspense until the very last moment for 150 years.


For immediate regurgitation:
The 2005-2006 Waste Reduction and Conservation Calendar, formerly known as the Garbage Calendar, will be distributed to London households by Thursday, September 29.

The new name reflects various environmental behaviour change initiatives the City of London is undertaking. These include air quality, climate change, transportation choices, urban watershed management and water conservation.

The new name is only one of several changes to this year’s calendar.
The term garbage must be officially avoided lest Londoners apply the third definition of garbage, courtesy of dictionary.com, to city staff,
1. Worthless or nonsensical matter; rubbish: Their advice turned out to be nothing but garbage.

2. Inferior or offensive literary or artistic material.
thus banishing them to the curbside:
“We wanted to focus on reducing the amount of garbage produced, increasing the amount of recyclable material and compost diverted from landfill while also raising public awareness about the upcoming four container limit,” says Jay Stanford, Division Manager of Environmental Programs and Customer Relations. “We have made several improvements to the template and have managed to maintain approximate production costs and delivery expenditures as last year.”

Other improvements from last year’s calendar include only one calendar per zone, an increase in calendar size and subsequent ease of use, more graphics and icons and additional environmental tips, facts and points throughout.

Requests for missed calendars will be taken after September 29, whereupon an online order form will become available at www.london.ca. Community members will be able to access this year’s calendar online through the City of London website as of October 1, 2005.
City staff are certainly doing all they can to increase the amount of paper in London blueboxes. We wouldn't need a schedule if garbage pickup was the same day, once a week, according to zone, like it used to be. The rotating schedule that we have now does nothing to reduce landfill, as people simply hold onto their garbage for an extra day or two. The current system only serves to confuse Londoners and employs useless bureaucrats who are paid to design and deliver David Suzuki style propaganda at the public's expense.

But I can only imagine what the glossy new calendar looks like as I haven't received mine yet, athough today is the 28th of September and the current schedule is expired. I can always get it from the internet, but I must wait until the first of October to access it, even though the print version of the schedule has apparently been distributed to certain privileged neighbourhoods. But I will do my part for the environment and print mine out in black and white, thereby freeing up the colour copies for other missed households.

2 comments:

David MacLean said...

That's hilarious...

gardner said...

you know what's interesting...city hall is imposing this garbage limit to households, but not to themselves...you should see the waste that they produce on a daily basis...perhaps they should start at city hall, then london...kind of makes them hypocrites...oh wait..they're already hypocrites