Tuesday, February 22, 2005

If it can't be stopped, make it taxable

The Government is rallying for a monopoly over pot sales. The oh so holy masters of our destinies will be discussing the legalization and taxation of marijuana sales, at the same time as they advocate tougher penalties for growers. Will a person who grows a few plants be charged with operating a 'grow-op'?

Delegates to the Liberal party convention next month will debate a motion to legalize and tax marijuana sales, bringing in billions in new tax revenue.

Parliament is already debating legislation to decriminalize marijuana, but a resolution by Alberta Liberals would go much further. It would tax the proceeds of legalized pot sales, which the resolution says would bring in $3 billion in revenue each year.

"Legalizing marijuana would be a serious blow to drug dealers and organized crime financially," says the resolution for the March 5-6 gathering.
The most serious blow to organized crime in this instance is to decriminalize marijuana and simply butt out. Considering that government grade weed is notoriously inferior, I doubt government attempts to secure a monopoly over marijuana sales is going to hurt the black market.

And for those that worry the government might be looking to make money from a 'dangerous' vice, have no fears, for the harbingers of justice resolve that:
"a portion of these tax revenues be used to educate youth against drug use and to provide treatment for those who are adversely affected by use of marijuana."
To be discussed at the same convention:
A motion from the New Brunswick and Nova Scotia delegations on education is sure to raise the hackles of Quebec delegates - it urges the creation of national education standards in core curriculum areas.
Seems Emily Murphy's legacy lives on. From chapter 10, part one, of The Black Candle:
All drugs used in Canada should be procured from the Government. What the Government does not prohibit, it must monopolize. There should be no profits on the products whatsoever.

If drugs were sold by the retailers on a system of triplicate order blanks, one of these going to the Federal Government, a complete check could be kept on sales, but, however managed, there should be a record on every grain from the time it leaves the importer till it reaches the ultimate consumer.

Illicit vendors in drugs should be handled sternly, whatever their status, and it would be well for the Government to consider whether or not these should be given the option of a fine. The profits from the traffic are so high that fines are not in any sense deterrent. Besides, these ruthless butchers of men and morals are entitled to no more delicate consideration than the white-slaver, the train-wrecker, housebreaker, or the perpetrator of any other head-long crime.

1 Comment:

basil said...

Wow, these words from our beloved Ms Murphy caught me off guard: "these ruthless butchers of men and morals are entitled to no more delicate consideration than the white-slaver the train-wrecker, housebreaker, or the perpetrator of any other head-long crime." Am I to assume she doesn't regard a non-"white-slaver" as a vile criminal? It's OK to deal in slaves as long as they're not white?!? Now I knew she was a bigot, but this book of hers was published in 1922. I don't think we should be celebrating this woman.